"The greatest problem in the world today is intolerance" - Princess Diana

During her life, Diana, Princess of Wales took hundreds of engagements on behalf of charities and President or Patron of over 100 of them. She is today associated with the work she supported with the homeless, disabled people, children and people with HIV/AIDS.

After she divorced from The Prince of Wales in 1996, The Princess stayed as patron of Centrepoint (homeless charity), the English National Ballet, Leprosy Mission and National Aids Trust.

She was also President of the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street and of the Royal Marsden Hospital.
In the year before her death in 1997, at the age of 36, the Princess was active in campaigning for a ban on the manufacture and use of land mines. She spoke at the landmines conference at the Royal Geographical Society in London, and followed this by visiting Washington to promote the American Red Cross landmines campaign.

The charities to benefit included Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund, which was founded after The Princess’s death; Sentebale, the Lesotho children’s charity which Prince Harry founded in memory of his mother; and the six organisations of which the Princess was Patron at the time of her death: the Royal Marsden and Great Ormond Street Hospitals, Centrepoint (Prince William is now Patron), Barnardo's, The Leprosy Mission, The National AIDS Trust and the English National Ballet.
Born Diana Spencer on July 1, 1961, Princess Diana became Lady Diana Spencer after her father inherited the title of Earl Spencer in 1975. She married heir to the British throne, Prince Charles, on July 29, 1981.

They had two sons and later divorced in 1996. Diana died in a car crash after trying to evade the paparazzi in Paris on the night of August 30, 1997

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The image of the Princess standing in a minefield in Angola in January 1997 put the issue of landmines in the headlines the world over. It is still an inspiring image today. When she spoke out with simple but practical words about HIV or was photographed holding the hand of someone with AIDS, she helped reduce stigma and the world took notice.

About Princess Diana & Charties

"The greatest problem in the world today is intolerance" - Princess Diana

During her life, Diana, Princess of Wales took hundreds of engagements on behalf of charities and President or Patron of over 100 of them. She is today associated with the work she supported with the homeless, disabled people, children and people with HIV/AIDS.

After she divorced from The Prince of Wales in 1996, The Princess stayed as patron of Centrepoint (homeless charity), the English National Ballet, Leprosy Mission and National Aids Trust.

She was also President of the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street and of the Royal Marsden Hospital.
In the year before her death in 1997, at the age of 36, the Princess was active in campaigning for a ban on the manufacture and use of land mines. She spoke at the landmines conference at the Royal Geographical Society in London, and followed this by visiting Washington to promote the American Red Cross landmines campaign.

The charities to benefit included Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund, which was founded after The Princess’s death; Sentebale, the Lesotho children’s charity which Prince Harry founded in memory of his mother; and the six organisations of which the Princess was Patron at the time of her death: the Royal Marsden and Great Ormond Street Hospitals, Centrepoint (Prince William is now Patron), Barnardo's, The Leprosy Mission, The National AIDS Trust and the English National Ballet.
Born Diana Spencer on July 1, 1961, Princess Diana became Lady Diana Spencer after her father inherited the title of Earl Spencer in 1975. She married heir to the British throne, Prince Charles, on July 29, 1981.

They had two sons and later divorced in 1996. Diana died in a car crash after trying to evade the paparazzi in Paris on the night of August 30, 1997

Princess Diana & Charties - Charities


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She is remembered for her devotion to all the causes she supported, but particularly for her championing of hitherto ‘unpopular' causes - such as those suffering from HIV/AIDS; those afflicted by Leprosy and those whose lives had been devastated by landmines. She was not afraid to speak out and show her support of those marginalised by society by becoming actively involved in highlighting their plight.